We see you're using an older version of Internet Explorer. This site is best viewed with the latest version.
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen
Illinois State Legislative Board

Trade Plan

The house just voted to extend the trade vote until July 30th. How they voted below.

 

Obama’s trade plan in critical condition

U.S. Democrats are still opposed to anything that would advance the president’s free trade pact.

Congressional leaders and the White House are quickly finding there’s no easy option to revive President Barack Obama’s free trade initiative, leaving the White House’s top legislative priority in critical condition after Democrats turned against it in droves last week.

Millions of dollars and countless hours have been spent trying to pass Trade Promotion Authority, a key component in President Barack Obama’s quest to strike a trade deal with 11 Pacific Rim countries. But Congress is now hung up on Trade Adjustment Assistance, a job training and aid program which typically rides alongside trade deals. One hundred and forty four Democrats abandoned Obama on the TAA bill, which needs to pass in order to send the legislation to the White House.

Party leaders in both houses of Congress are in touch with the White House in an attempt to figure out how to advance the legislation.
But House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, speaking to reporters Monday, said “the best option right now” is for “the Democrats come to their senses” and back TAA.

It’s not that simple, though.

Pro-trade Democrats, including those close to the White House, would like to see Speaker John Boehner hold one vote on TAA and fast-track authority. Boehner (R-Ohio) split the vote last week, to give Republicans a chance to vote for fast-track authority, and Democrats a chance to vote for TAA. Since that failed, Democrats believe Boehner should put it back together, the theory being pro-trade Republicans and Democrats would vote for the legislation and send it to Obama’s desk.

But top House Republicans say there is no way that bill can pass the chamber, since scores of GOP lawmakers would dissent, due to objections to TAA.

“No chance of that passing,” one senior GOP lawmaker said. “None.”

Another option being floated, according to several sources, would be for leaders to insert TAA into an otherwise non-controversial customs bill, which was passed overwhelmingly by the House last week. House GOP leaders are wary, though, because they think the inclusion of TAA could sink the bill.

Top House Republicans say there is no way that bill can pass the chamber.

Of course, Boehner could try to force another vote on TAA and hope that Obama can flip upwards of 70 Democrats. That’s also extremely unlikely.

A less plausible option would be to try to insert TAA into another must-pass bill. But Democrats seem ready to oppose any legislation that includes TAA.

The speaker could also try to pass fast-track authority on its own, without TAA attached. But at least some of the 29 Democrats who voted for fast track might oppose the legislation if help for workers displaced by trade isn’t part of the package. Senior aides doubt the Senate can pass a fast-track bill without the job training piece.

“We’ve always said that the price of getting TPA is TAA,” Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch of Utah said.

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) was equally circumspect about the prospect of fast-track authority without job training.
“We will try to do the best we can depending on what the House can pass,” he said Monday. “If they can pass something, I’m sure we will try… It’s too important to give up on.”

Leaving a GOP leadership meeting Monday evening, McCarthy and Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) both told POLITICO there have been no firm decisions on how to proceed. But Republicans see this as Obama’s problem to solve.

“We obviously did a lot of heavy lifting over here to get the bill passed. I know the House leadership is trying to come up with a way forward,” Cornyn said. “But the truth is this is the president’s problem and it’s the Democrats who basically cut him off at the knees.”

To that end, House Republican leaders are considering holding another vote on TAA this week, and they have crafted a process to give themselves a few days to make a final decision. That vote would, in part, serve to highlight the pervasive Democratic disarray. But even passing a measure on the floor to give themselves more time would prove difficult.

The White House, meanwhile, continues to argue that Democratic opposition to TAA is nothing more than a procedural snag that House Republican leadership needs to work out. That comment has infuriated Democrats and Republicans alike, who recognize the stiff opposition the package faces.

“There’s a bipartisan majority in the House of Representatives for trade adjustment assistance,” White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said. “The reason it didn’t pass at the end of last week is because there are some procedural differences that have to be ironed out.”

White House officials have been reaching out to lawmakers since Friday’s ill-fated vote, but there doesn’t appear to be an all-out blitz from Obama’s team. Earnest said that White House chief of staff Denis McDonough had spoken with Pelosi and McCarthy by phone. He also said that Obama had tried to call Boehner but that as of mid-day Monday, he hadn’t heard back.

 

 

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 366

(Republicans in roman; Democrats in italic; Independents underlined)
H RES 315      YEA-AND-NAY      16-Jun-2015      1:56 PM
QUESTION:  On Agreeing to the Resolution
BILL TITLE: Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 2596) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2016 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes to extend the Trade vote until July 30th.

YEAS NAYS PRES NV
REPUBLICAN 233 6   6
DEMOCRATIC 3 183   2
INDEPENDENT        
TOTALS 236 189   8

 

—- YEAS    236 —

 

Abraham
Aderholt
Allen
Amodei
Ashford
Babin
Barletta
Barr
Benishek
Bilirakis
Bishop (MI)
Bishop (UT)
Black
Blackburn
Blum
Bost
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Brat
Bridenstine
Brooks (IN)
Buchanan
Buck
Bucshon
Burgess
Calvert
Carter (GA)
Carter (TX)
Chabot
Clawson (FL)
Coffman
Cole
Collins (GA)
Collins (NY)
Comstock
Conaway
Cook
Cooper
Costa
Costello (PA)
Cramer
Crawford
Crenshaw
Culberson
Curbelo (FL)
Davis, Rodney
Denham
Dent
DeSantis
DesJarlais
Diaz-Balart
Dold
Donovan
Duffy
Duncan (SC)
Duncan (TN)
Ellmers (NC)
Emmer (MN)
Farenthold
Fincher
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Fleming
Flores
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Garrett
Gibbs
Gibson
Goodlatte
Gosar
Gowdy
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (LA)
Graves (MO)
Griffith
Grothman
Guinta
Guthrie
Hanna
Hardy
Harper
Harris
Hartzler
Heck (NV)
Hensarling
Herrera Beutler
Hice, Jody B.
Hill
Holding
Hudson
Huelskamp
Huizenga (MI)
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurd (TX)
Hurt (VA)
Issa
Jenkins (KS)
Jenkins (WV)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, Sam
Jolly
Jordan
Joyce
Katko
Kelly (PA)
King (IA)
Kinzinger (IL)
Kline
Knight
Labrador
LaMalfa
Lamborn
Lance
Latta
LoBiondo
Long
Loudermilk
Love
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lummis
MacArthur
Marchant
Marino
McCarthy
McCaul
McClintock
McHenry
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
McSally
Meadows
Meehan
Messer
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Moolenaar
Mooney (WV)
Mullin
Mulvaney
Murphy (PA)
Neugebauer
Newhouse
Noem
Nugent
Nunes
Olson
Palazzo
Palmer
Paulsen
Pearce
Perry
Pittenger
Pitts
Poe (TX)
Poliquin
Pompeo
Price, Tom
Ratcliffe
Reichert
Renacci
Ribble
Rice (SC)
Rigell
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Rooney (FL)
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam
Ross
Rothfus
Rouzer
Royce
Russell
Ryan (WI)
Salmon
Sanford
Scalise
Schweikert
Scott, Austin
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Smith (MO)
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Stefanik
Stewart
Stivers
Stutzman
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiberi
Tipton
Trott
Turner
Upton
Valadao
Wagner
Walberg
Walden
Walker
Walorski
Walters, Mimi
Weber (TX)
Webster (FL)
Wenstrup
Westerman
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Williams
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Womack
Woodall
Yoder
Yoho
Young (AK)
Young (IA)
Young (IN)
Zeldin
Zinke

 

—- NAYS    189 —

 

Adams
Aguilar
Amash
Bass
Beatty
Becerra
Bera
Beyer
Bishop (GA)
Blumenauer
Bonamici
Boyle, Brendan F.
Brady (PA)
Brooks (AL)
Brown (FL)
Brownley (CA)
Bustos
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cárdenas
Carney
Carson (IN)
Cartwright
Castor (FL)
Castro (TX)
Chu, Judy
Cicilline
Clark (MA)
Clarke (NY)
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Connolly
Conyers
Courtney
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davis (CA)
Davis, Danny
DeFazio
DeGette
Delaney
DeLauro
DelBene
DeSaulnier
Deutch
Dingell
Doggett
Doyle, Michael F.
Duckworth
Edwards
Ellison
Engel
Eshoo
Esty
Farr
Fattah
Foster
Frankel (FL)
Fudge
Gabbard
Gallego
Garamendi
Gohmert
Graham
Grayson
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutiérrez
Hahn
Hastings
Heck (WA)
Higgins
Himes
Hinojosa
Honda
Hoyer
Huffman
Israel
Jackson Lee
Jeffries
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones
Kaptur
Keating
Kelly (IL)
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilmer
Kind
Kirkpatrick
Kuster
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lawrence
Lee
Levin
Lewis
Lieu, Ted
Lipinski
Loebsack
Lofgren
Lowenthal
Lowey
Lujan Grisham (NM)
Luján, Ben Ray (NM)
Lynch
Maloney, Carolyn
Maloney, Sean
Massie
Matsui
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
McNerney
Meeks
Meng
Moore
Moulton
Murphy (FL)
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nolan
Norcross
O’Rourke
Pallone
Pascrell
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peters
Peterson
Pingree
Pocan
Polis
Posey
Price (NC)
Quigley
Rangel
Rice (NY)
Richmond
Roybal-Allard
Ruiz
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schrader
Scott (VA)
Scott, David
Serrano
Sherman
Sinema
Sires
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Speier
Swalwell (CA)
Takai
Takano
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Titus
Tonko
Torres
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Vargas
Veasey
Vela
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters, Maxine
Watson Coleman
Welch
Wilson (FL)
Yarmuth

 

—- NOT VOTING    8 —

 

Barton
Byrne
Chaffetz
Kelly (MS)
King (NY)
Reed
Sanchez, Loretta
Sewell (AL)

Leave a Comment